Getting Help

PIRI’s Infant Clinic

If you live in Melbourne, you may be able to attend PIRI’s Infant Clinic in Heidelberg.  These services are linked to the Austin Health Perinatal Mental Health Service. To find out about the range of clinical support services for parents, phone (03) 9496-4496 or email piri@austin.org.au

If you have Bupa or Teacher’s Health Fund private health insurance, click below to see the services you can access.

Bupa Parent and Baby Wellbeing Program

Teacher’s Health Fund Parent and Infant Program

PIRI’s Treatment Trials

If you are interested in joining one of PIRI’s free treatment trials, click here for more information, or see our FAQs About Research.

Other Resources and Support

For other resources and support click here.

Crisis Lines & Other Services

Below are some state-wide and national websites and helplines you can access for more information or in a crisis situation.

Perinatal Anxiety and Depression Association (PANDA)

1300 726 306

Monday-Friday 10am – 5pm (AEST / ADST)

www.panda.org.au

Centre of Perinatal Excellence (COPE)

www.cope.org.au

Lifeline

13 11 14

www.lifeline.org.au

Mensline

1300 78 99 78

www.mensline.org.au

Suicide Call Back Service

1300 659 467

www.suicidecallbackservice.org.au

VICTORIA:

Maternal and Child Health Line — 24 hour a day, 7 days a week — 13 22 29
Parentline VIC — 8am to 12am Mon-Fri,10am to 10pm Weekends — 13 22 89
Lifeline — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 13 11 14

NEW SOUTH WALES:

Karitane Careline — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 1300 227 464
Parentline NSW — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 1300 130 052
Lifeline — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 13 11 14

ACT:

healthdirect Australia — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 1800 022 222
Parentline ACT — 9am – 9pm Monday to Friday (except public holidays) — (02) 6287 3833

QUEENSLAND

Child Health Line — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 13 43 25 84
Parentline QLD & NT — 8am to 10pm, seven days a week — 1300 30 1300
Lifeline — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 13 11 14

SOUTH AUSTRALIA:

Child and Youth Health Service — 9am – 4.30pm Monday to Friday — 1300 733 606
Parent Helpline SA — 24 hours a day, seven days a week — 1300 364 100
Lifeline — 24 hours a day, seven days a week — 13 11 14

WESTERN AUSTRALIA:

healthdirect Australia — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 1800 022 222
Parent Help Centre WA — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 1800 654 432
Lifeline — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 13 11 14

NORTHERN TERRITORY:

healthdirect Australia — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 1800 022 222
Parentline QLD & NT — 8am to 10pm, seven days a week — 1300 30 1300
Lifeline — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 13 11 14

TASMANIA:

Parenting Line TAS — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 1300 808 178
Lifeline — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week — 13 11 14

Frequently Asked Questions About Research

PIRI is currently recruiting interested participants for current projects. Below are some common questions that people ask themselves when considering becoming involved in a research project.

What are the benefits to me?

Participating in research can be a great way to access information and treatment programs that are at the cutting edge of current knowledge. Research programs are generally offered free of charge and may help to add to your range of available options. Treatment options may include: participation in group therapy, individual or telephone counselling, or receiving tailored information and training.

What are the benefits to others?

Sometimes the research programs that we offer do not provide any direct benefits to the participant. In these cases, it is simply the knowledge that you are helping to contribute to the benefit of other people in the future that might motivate you to be involved.
No matter which research program you are looking at and what it involves you should take some time to consider the implications before signing up.

What will be involved?

Usually our research participants are asked to fill in questionnaires, attend treatment sessions or give medical data. Being compliant with what is being asked of you is an important aspect of being a research participant.
It is important to fully understand what will be asked of you before you say yes!

Where do I find more information ?

All research programs run by PIRI have a ‘Participant Information and Consent Form’. This form details what is involved, the possible risks of involvement, alternatives to involvement and your privacy and confidentiality as a research participant. Before agreeing to participate in a study you will need to read and sign the consent form.

Other good sources of information are the project brochure, information on the website or calling PIRI to speak to the research co-ordinator.

What does it mean to be ‘randomised’ to a group?

The goal of most research programs is to measure whether the treatment being investigated actually works. The most common way of measuring the effects of a research program is to compare a ‘control group’ and a ‘treatment group’. At PIRI, we will at the very minimum compare our research treatments against what is currently considered to be ‘best practice’ for the control group.

If you are involved in a program that includes randomisation, you will be randomly allocated to receive either the research treatment or the control treatment. Randomisation is extremely important to ensure that the results are measuring the treatment effects.

Which research study is right for me?

Choosing a research program may depend on several things: your availability, what the current projects are, the inclusion criteria and recruitment procedures, and what is involved in the study.

Please feel free to call us on (03) 9496 4496 and speak to one of our friendly staff.